Issue 36 Friendship Winter 2009/10

Letter to an Unremembered Companion

Christine Wertheim

| don’t remember the shape of your face | don’t remember the cut of your hair | don’t remember the look in your eyes | don’t remember if you’re dark or fair | don’t remember your body’s weight | don’t remember if we matched in size | don’t remember if you’re tall or short | don’t remember you being there | don’t remember your hands or feet | don’t remember your ears and nose | don’t remember your arms or legs | don’t remember if you stood or posed | don’t remember your teeth and mouth | don’t remember the smell of your breath | don’t remember the tone of your skin | don’t remember if U ever blushed | don’t remember the top of your head | don’t remember your fingers or toes| don’t remember your chin and brow | don’t remember U anyhow | don’t remember the arc of your smile | don’t remember the faces you made | don’t remember whether you cried | don’t remember if you were well bred | don’t remember your character type | don’t remember whether U lied | don’t remember you angry or sad | don’t remember any words you said | don’t remember the clothes you wore | don’t remember if your feet were shod | don’t remember at all your toys | don’t remember if you had pets | don’t remember the sound of your voice | don’t remember the language you spoke | don’t remember your parents’ creed | don’t remember if it involved God | don’t remember the places we played | don’t remember the games we shared | don’t remember our boyhood romps | don’t remember that I ever cared | don’t remember your mother’s cooking | don’t remember your father’s stare | don’t remember your family home | don’t remember although | was there | don’t remember what you liked | don’t remember how you walked | don’t remember if we argued | don’t remember that we talked | don’t remember if we held hands | don’t remember the warmth of our bond | don’t remember the friendly air | don’t remember of U being fond | don’t remember your body near me | don’t remember the feeling of joy | don’t remember our friendship flowering | don’t remember U my boy | don’t remember wanting to see U | don’t remember being sad when U left | don’t remember awaiting your visits | don’t remember feeling bereft | don’t remember our first union | don’t remember when we last met | don’t remember thinking about U | don’t remember why I forget | don’t remember the pain of parting | don’t remember if tears we shed | don’t remember missing U | don’t remember your memory’s dead | don’t remember the days U speak of | don’t remember the photos U send | don’t remember our time together | don’t remember being your friend | don’t remember your presence near me | don’t remember tho’ the pictures I see | don’t remember you’re still a blank | don’t remember but | recognize me | don’t remember my visions of U | don’t remember your bottom or top | don’t remember your left or right | don’t remember U in my sight | don’t remember your face eludes me | don’t remember your gestures are gone | don’t remember your character’s faded | don’t remember your image has worn | don’t remember your age or name | don’t remember my memory’s spent | don’t remember a thing about U | don’t remember not a single event | don’t remember my mind is slipping | don’t remember my heart’s grown old | don’t remember remembrance fails me | don’t remember can | be so cold? | don’t remember what was once so dear | don’t remember | really forget | don’t remember | can’t recall U | don’t remember at least not yet | don’t remember | can’t conceive it | don’t remember | deeply regret | don’t remember |’m sad to say | don’t remember. Can you forget? | don’t remember | can’t conceive it | don’t remember | deeply regret | don’t remember |’m sad to say | don’t remember. Can you forget? 


Christine Wertheim is a Los Angeles-based poet and critic, and chair of the MFA Writing Program at the California Institute of the Arts. Her books include +|’me’S-pace (Les Figues Press, 2007), Feminaissance (Les Figues Press, 2010), and The /n/oulipian Analects, co-edited with Matias Viegener (Les Figues Press, 2007).

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